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today-in-history-今日歷史-05-12】national-porridge-day

【 Today in History 今日歷史 - 05-12】National Porridge Day

HISTORY OF NATIONAL PORRIDGE DAY The history of porridge is as rich as the dish itself. Before the invention of baking ovens, porridge was the most essential part of the British diet. Porridge, or gruel, has been indulged in cross-culturally for centuries. The origins of porridge can be traced to Northern Europe, where it was traditionally enjoyed savory. The word ‘porridge’ first appeared in the 16th century and is believed to be a spin-off of the word ‘pottage’ — a type of stew. Porridge hasn’t always been the way it is today. Preparation ingredients varied from grass-borne grains to other crops. Quinoa grain has been used for making porridge for more than 3,000 years, whereas rice porridge was eaten in China since 2500 B.C. It goes back even further than this, with evidence discovered by researchers proving that the cooked mush was eaten in some form as far back as 12,000 years ago, at the beginning of the Neolithic Revolution. Soon after, people started preparing thick pancakes on stone ovens or hot tiles, using porridge-like mixtures. Such flatbreads are mentioned throughout the Old Testament, but a similar innovation simultaneously occurred throughout the world. The popularity of porridge and its many variations led to the creation of corn cakes, cornbreads, corn puddings, etc. In the past few years, there has been a renewed interest in porridge. Artisan cooks and high-profile chefs are experimenting with the bland ingredients of porridge to blend and create different flavors around the world.

today-in-history-05-17】germany-dam-busters-raid-1943

【 Today in History 今日歷史 - 05-17】Germany Dam Busters Raid 1943

Germany Dam Busters Raid
1943 : Lancaster bombers use the revolutionary bomb designed to bounce on the water to bypass dam defenses ( immortalized in a 1954 war film Dambusters ) . The bombs were invented for the task by aircraft engineer Dr Barnes Wallis with pilots flying the Lancaster bombers just 100 ft above the water. The destruction of the dams two on the rivers Möhne and Sorpe, and a third on the River Eder caused flood waters to sweep through the Ruhr valley, damaging factories, houses and power stations.

【culture-english-10】hanami-japan-s-cherry-blossom-festival-東京十大櫻花景點

【Culture English -10】Hanami: Japan's Cherry Blossom Festival ( 東京十大櫻花景點 )

Top 10 Cherry Blossom Spots in Tokyo Tokyo is Japan's capital, and most populated metropolis, and also boasts more cherry blossom-viewing hotspots than anywhere else in the country. Nestled amid its giant buildings and winding expressways are a plethora of parks, gardens, tree-lined lanes, and riverbanks that offer some of the best sakura experiences in all of Japan. Visitors from around the world flock to Tokyo each spring to take in the beautiful blossoms. In the average year, the peak of the Sakura season occurs for one week in early April. However, depending on temperatures in the preceding weeks, the peak can start in late March or last into mid-April. It is also worth mentioning that due to the variety of cherry trees found throughout the city, even if you are visiting for a few weeks on either side of this zone, you should still be able to find a few blossoms. With so many spots to choose from, we thought we'd make planning your perfect, petal-filled trip a little easier by giving a quick rundown of our Top 10 cherry blossom locations in Tokyo.

Number 10: Koishikawa Botanical Garden Belonging to the prestigious Tokyo University, Koishikawa Botanical Garden is home to thousands of varieties of trees and plants as well as a beautiful landscape garden. During spring it doesn't get as crowded as other popular Sakura spots around the city, making for a pleasant atmosphere for visitors to enjoy the blossoms.

Numer 9: The Meguro River The Meguro River is an attractive canal lined with hundreds of cherry trees and a plethora of shops and cafes in one of the capital's hippest neighborhoods. During peak season, the many bridges that span the waterway provide picturesque views of the river crowded with pink petals so don't forget to bring your camera.

Number 8: Koishikawa Korakuen Among Tokyo's prettiest traditional gardens, Koishikawa Korakuen is particularly famous for its weeping cherry trees, which take center stage in spring among the park's many other picturesque features.

Number 7: Asukayama Park This hilltop park in the north of the city has been popular as an atmospheric hanami spot since the Edo Period and still attracts a large number of cherry blossom lovers of all ages even now.

Number 6: Yoyogi Park One of the city's more well-known parks. Yoyogi sits across the street from the stylish Harajuku neighborhood and is directly next to the famous Meiji Shrine. This expansive park is a hotspot for hanami parties, having enough space for a lively atmosphere to prevail here throughout the season.

Number 5: Showa Kinenkoen With over a thousand trees, this huge, family-friendly park is located 30 minutes west of Tokyo. The abundant blossoms here typically bloom a few days later than those in central Tokyo, making the park popular with those who missed hanami downtown. Aside from the cherry blossoms, the park also boasts other beautiful flowers and a variety of facilities and amenities.

Number 4: Sumida Park During spring the walking paths along the shores of this picturesque river become lined with pink petals. Located only a short walk from the famous Sensoji Temple in Asakusa, Sumida Park is an ideal place for visitors to take in views of the iconic Tokyo Skytree framed by cherry blossoms.

Number 3: Chi-dori-ga-fuchi One of the most photogenic sakura spots in the city, Chidorigafuchi consists of a path alongside the sakura-lined moat of the former Edo Castle just west of the Imperial Palace. For a fee, visitors can even rent a rowboat to paddle around in the old moat. This atmospheric area makes for a charming petal-filled stroll both during the day and also in the evening during nightly illuminations. Lastly, the nearby Yasukuni Shrine is home to hundreds more cherry trees, including Tokyo's representative tree, which the meteorological agency uses to determine the state of the sakura season for the entire city.

Number 2: Ueno Park Ueno Park is the most renowned party spot in all of Tokyo during the Sakura season and is a true hanami haven packed with visitors enjoying the festivities both in the upper section where the wide central walking path is located and also around Shinobazu Pond in the lower section. The park's paths are lined with hundreds of cherry trees, and it's recommended to get here early if you intend to get a place under one.

Number1: Shinjuku Gyoen This large, family-friendly park stands as a natural oasis in one of Tokyo's busiest districts. This peaceful park boasts over one thousand cherry trees which span a range of species and bloom at different times during the season, making Shinjuku Gyoen a great place to visit for blossom enthusiasts who are in town a little before or after peak season. One point to be aware of is that the park doesn't allow alcohol inside so it is not a good option for visitors intent on enjoying their hanami with some drinks. Nevertheless, with so many beautiful scenes and Sakura viewing opportunities throughout its vast and varied grounds, Shinjuku Gyoen takes the cake as our number one Sakura location in all of Tokyo. So there you have it, our top ten cherry blossom spots in Tokyo. Happy Hanami Sakura Festival! References (optional)
Cherry Blossom Sweets Sakura food and drinks Japan Cherry Blossom Forecast: When & Where To See Sakura in Japan National Cherry Blossom Festival, Washington DC Spring Festivals Around the World Discussion Questions (Cherry Blossom Festival in Japan) What is the Cherry Blossom Festival in Japan? When does the Cherry Blossom Festival usually take place in Japan? Why are cherry blossoms so important in Japanese culture? Where are some popular locations to view cherry blossoms in Japan? What is hanami? How is it related to the Cherry Blossom Festival? What are some traditional activities people do during the Cherry Blossom Festival? How long do cherry blossoms typically last? What colors are cherry blossoms? What do cherry blossoms symbolize in Japan? Do people have picnics under cherry blossoms during the festival? Are there any special foods or drinks associated with the Cherry Blossom Festival? Are there any traditional songs or dances performed during the festival? What is the significance of cherry blossoms in Japanese literature? Are there any historical events related to the Cherry Blossom Festival? How do Japanese people prepare for the Cherry Blossom Festival? What is the traditional clothing worn during the festival? Are there any variations of cherry blossoms that are different colors? How can tourists participate in the Cherry Blossom Festival in Japan? What other countries have a similar celebration of cherry blossoms? Are there any customs or etiquette rules to follow during the festival?
ESL Questions About Cherry Blossom Festival (Japan)

【culture-english-10】hanami-japan-s-cherry-blossom-festival

【Culture English -10】Hanami: Japan's Cherry Blossom Festival ( 東京十大櫻花景點 )

Top 10 Cherry Blossom Spots in Tokyo Tokyo is Japan's capital, and most populated metropolis, and also boasts more cherry blossom-viewing hotspots than anywhere else in the country. Nestled amid its giant buildings and winding expressways are a plethora of parks, gardens, tree-lined lanes, and riverbanks that offer some of the best sakura experiences in all of Japan. Visitors from around the world flock to Tokyo each spring to take in the beautiful blossoms. In the average year, the peak of the Sakura season occurs for one week in early April. However, depending on temperatures in the preceding weeks, the peak can start in late March or last into mid-April. It is also worth mentioning that due to the variety of cherry trees found throughout the city, even if you are visiting for a few weeks on either side of this zone, you should still be able to find a few blossoms. With so many spots to choose from, we thought we'd make planning your perfect, petal-filled trip a little easier by giving a quick rundown of our Top 10 cherry blossom locations in Tokyo.

Number 10: Koishikawa Botanical Garden Belonging to the prestigious Tokyo University, Koishikawa Botanical Garden is home to thousands of varieties of trees and plants as well as a beautiful landscape garden. During spring it doesn't get as crowded as other popular Sakura spots around the city, making for a pleasant atmosphere for visitors to enjoy the blossoms.

Numer 9: The Meguro River The Meguro River is an attractive canal lined with hundreds of cherry trees and a plethora of shops and cafes in one of the capital's hippest neighborhoods. During peak season, the many bridges that span the waterway provide picturesque views of the river crowded with pink petals so don't forget to bring your camera.

Number 8: Koishikawa Korakuen Among Tokyo's prettiest traditional gardens, Koishikawa Korakuen is particularly famous for its weeping cherry trees, which take center stage in spring among the park's many other picturesque features.

Number 7: Asukayama Park This hilltop park in the north of the city has been popular as an atmospheric hanami spot since the Edo Period and still attracts a large number of cherry blossom lovers of all ages even now.

Number 6: Yoyogi Park One of the city's more well-known parks. Yoyogi sits across the street from the stylish Harajuku neighborhood and is directly next to the famous Meiji Shrine. This expansive park is a hotspot for hanami parties, having enough space for a lively atmosphere to prevail here throughout the season.

Number 5: Showa Kinenkoen With over a thousand trees, this huge, family-friendly park is located 30 minutes west of Tokyo. The abundant blossoms here typically bloom a few days later than those in central Tokyo, making the park popular with those who missed hanami downtown. Aside from the cherry blossoms, the park also boasts other beautiful flowers and a variety of facilities and amenities.

Number 4: Sumida Park During spring the walking paths along the shores of this picturesque river become lined with pink petals. Located only a short walk from the famous Sensoji Temple in Asakusa, Sumida Park is an ideal place for visitors to take in views of the iconic Tokyo Skytree framed by cherry blossoms.

Number 3: Chi-dori-ga-fuchi One of the most photogenic sakura spots in the city, Chidorigafuchi consists of a path alongside the sakura-lined moat of the former Edo Castle just west of the Imperial Palace. For a fee, visitors can even rent a rowboat to paddle around in the old moat. This atmospheric area makes for a charming petal-filled stroll both during the day and also in the evening during nightly illuminations. Lastly, the nearby Yasukuni Shrine is home to hundreds more cherry trees, including Tokyo's representative tree, which the meteorological agency uses to determine the state of the sakura season for the entire city.

Number 2: Ueno Park Ueno Park is the most renowned party spot in all of Tokyo during the Sakura season and is a true hanami haven packed with visitors enjoying the festivities both in the upper section where the wide central walking path is located and also around Shinobazu Pond in the lower section. The park's paths are lined with hundreds of cherry trees, and it's recommended to get here early if you intend to get a place under one.

Number1: Shinjuku Gyoen This large, family-friendly park stands as a natural oasis in one of Tokyo's busiest districts. This peaceful park boasts over one thousand cherry trees which span a range of species and bloom at different times during the season, making Shinjuku Gyoen a great place to visit for blossom enthusiasts who are in town a little before or after peak season. One point to be aware of is that the park doesn't allow alcohol inside so it is not a good option for visitors intent on enjoying their hanami with some drinks. Nevertheless, with so many beautiful scenes and Sakura viewing opportunities throughout its vast and varied grounds, Shinjuku Gyoen takes the cake as our number one Sakura location in all of Tokyo. So there you have it, our top ten cherry blossom spots in Tokyo. Happy Hanami Sakura Festival! References (optional)
Cherry Blossom Sweets Sakura food and drinks Japan Cherry Blossom Forecast: When & Where To See Sakura in Japan National Cherry Blossom Festival, Washington DC Spring Festivals Around the World Discussion Questions (Cherry Blossom Festival in Japan) What is the Cherry Blossom Festival in Japan? When does the Cherry Blossom Festival usually take place in Japan? Why are cherry blossoms so important in Japanese culture? Where are some popular locations to view cherry blossoms in Japan? What is hanami? How is it related to the Cherry Blossom Festival? What are some traditional activities people do during the Cherry Blossom Festival? How long do cherry blossoms typically last? What colors are cherry blossoms? What do cherry blossoms symbolize in Japan? Do people have picnics under cherry blossoms during the festival? Are there any special foods or drinks associated with the Cherry Blossom Festival? Are there any traditional songs or dances performed during the festival? What is the significance of cherry blossoms in Japanese literature? Are there any historical events related to the Cherry Blossom Festival? How do Japanese people prepare for the Cherry Blossom Festival? What is the traditional clothing worn during the festival? Are there any variations of cherry blossoms that are different colors? How can tourists participate in the Cherry Blossom Festival in Japan? What other countries have a similar celebration of cherry blossoms? Are there any customs or etiquette rules to follow during the festival?
ESL Questions About Cherry Blossom Festival (Japan)

【culture-english-13】easter-culture-traditions-復活節傳統的歷史

【Culture English -13】Easter Culture & Traditions (復活節傳統的歷史)

Easter Culture & Traditions Easter Sunday in the United States is among the most important religious holidays in the nation. There are also secular events held around this holiday, and in some cases, families celebrate traditions, other than the Christian one. For Christians, the holiday is centered on the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Churches hold special events during Easter weekend. Besides midnight masses on Christmas Eve, Easter services are some of the most popular in churches in the United States. Do you know when many of them hold these services?
We'll show you the answer at the end of this video. Aside from the religious traditions which vary from church to church, Easter Sunday in the United States is celebrated in other ways as well. Whether or not they happen to be followers of any church, people in the United States are inclined to have family gatherings on this day, and large feasts are usually served. For some people, Easter Sunday is merely a celebration of spring while for others it has tremendous religious significance. The most prevalent Easter Sunday tradition involves church services. Some churches hold elaborate parades to celebrate the day, and others have less noticeable celebrations. Most churches at least have social events over the Easter holiday allowing them to spend time with their fellow churchgoers and to socialize. Picnics and other events are also commonly held during this particular holiday. Secular events held during Easter Sunday include Easter egg hunts and other activities for children. These events are open to everyone and don't have any particular religious overtones to them. Community events are often held as well simply because the holiday is notable and people tend to want to get together. The Easter Bunny, eggs, flowers, and other symbols, are very much associated with spring and are still important traditions for this particular holiday. Because denominations in the United States are so diverse, you'll find many different traditions being celebrated on Easter Sunday. Some traditions involve all-night vigils before the holiday itself. And now, here's the answer to the quiz. Do you know when many churches hold Easter services? Ans: Services at the break of day, are among the most popular church events on Easter Sunday. During these services, Christians come to church in the pre-dawn hours and have their service as the Sun rises. For many, these services have a powerful symbolic significance.
How is this lesson? Did you learn something interesting? What kind of Easter traditions exist in your country? Reference (optional) History of Easter The History of Easter & Origin of the Easter Bunny and Easter Eggs? " What is the origin of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs? " In this video, I'll answer that question from a historical and biblical perspective.
It is commonly thought that the word ' Easter ' comes from a pagan figure called ' Eostre ' who was celebrated as the ' Goddess of Spring ' by the Saxons of Northern Europe. The only problem with this theory is that it has no basis in history. The existence of a goddess named 'Eostre' or a spring festival in her honor, is based on pure conjecture .
The same is true of the origin of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs —no one knows for sure how these things became a part of Easter observances . The most we can say is that the word Easter is probably related to the word East (ost in German ) and that the Saxons had a month they called ' Eosturmononath'. The legend of the Easter bunny bringing eggs appears to have been brought to the United States by settlers from Germany. The German tradition of the Easter bunny (or Oschter Haws ) migrated to America in the 1700s, accompanying German immigrants, many of whom settled in Pennsylvania. Over the past 200 years, the Easter bunny has become the most commercially recognized symbol of Easter in the United States . Other countries use other animals as the symbol of Easter, such as the Cuckoo in Switzerland .
In legend, the Easter bunny, also called the Easter hare , and the spring bunny, brings baskets filled with colored eggs, candy, and sometimes toys to the homes of children on the night before Easter, in much the same way as Santa Claus is said to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. The Easter Bunny will either put the baskets in a designated place or hide them somewhere in the house or garden for the children to find when they wake up in the morning, giving rise to the tradition of the Easter egg hunt . Obviously, none of this comes from the Bible.
Should Christian parents allow their children to participate in traditional activities that refer to the Easter bunny? This is a question both parents and church leaders struggle with. There is nothing essentially evil about the Easter bunny. What is important is our focus. If our focus is on Christ and not the Easter bunny, our children will understand that, like Santa Claus, the Easter bunny is merely a symbol . Easter should be a time to reflect upon and celebrate the resurrection of Christ . History of Easter Eggs Faberge Eggs 12 Fabulous Fabergé Eggs — choose your favorite The History of the White House Easter Egg Roll The International Easter Traditions Quiz Belgian Easter Celebration The Holy Week Processions in Sevilla, Spain (Procesion de los Pasos) What do they wear in Semana Santa? Celebrated by Catholic religious brotherhoods, Semana Santa is traditionally observed with penitent processions and passion plays all over Spain. Worn under the mantilla is a peineta, or a large decorative comb fixed to the hair, which is traditionally worn in a low bun . Why do penitents in Spain wear hoods?
The penitent hoods date back to the Spanish Inquisition. In the 15th century, it was decreed that those convicted of religious crimes had to wear conical hoods so that everyone knew they had sinned . This symbol of imposed penitence from the Inquisition was later translated into processions. Why does Costaleros wear a cloth over their head and neck?
To this day, each costalero wears a coffee bag over his head, as a kind of protective headgear , like that which dockworkers once used (even if many are now replicas, rather than the actual thing). Reference Links (optional) What are the origins of Easter?
Origins of Easter 5 Facts about Semana Santa: Holy Week in Spain Seville's streets flooded with 60 processions throughout Holy Week
All You Need To Know About Semana Santa in Seville Easter Around the World
29 Traditional Easter Foods From Around the World Classic Easter dishes around the world

Related:
Celebrating Mardi Gras in New Orleans Discussion Questions (optional) (1) What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘Easter?
(2) What is Easter?
(3) According to the Christian religion, Easter is a more important holiday than Christmas. Why to you think this is so?
(4) How do people spend Easter in your country?
(5) What are the traditional Easter dishes in your country?
(6) How do people prepare for Easter?
(7) What more would you like to know about Easter?
(8) Are there any special rituals performed right before or after Easter?
(9) Have you ever spent Easter in another country? Would you like to?
(10) "Easter tells us that life is to be interpreted not simply in terms of things but in terms of ideals." What do you think this quote means? (11) Should Easter be at the same time / on the same date every year?
(12) What do you like and dislike about Easter?
(13) What's the symbolism of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs?
(14) What is the meaning of Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday?
(15) What do people in your country do on Easter Monday?
(16) Do you prefer Easter or Christmas?
(17) There would be no Christmas if there was no Easter. Do you agree?
(18) Is Easter less commercial than Christmas? Why (not)?
(19) Someone once said: "The resurrection gives my life meaning and direction and the opportunity to start over no matter what my circumstances." What do you think this means?
(20) Do you think that people will stop celebrating Easter one day?

【cultureenglish-13】easter-sunday

【Culture English -13】Easter Culture & Traditions (復活節傳統的歷史)

Easter Culture & Traditions Easter Sunday in the United States is among the most important religious holidays in the nation. There are also secular events held around this holiday, and in some cases, families celebrate traditions, other than the Christian one. For Christians, the holiday is centered on the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Churches hold special events during Easter weekend. Besides midnight masses on Christmas Eve, Easter services are some of the most popular in churches in the United States. Do you know when many of them hold these services?
We'll show you the answer at the end of this video. Aside from the religious traditions which vary from church to church, Easter Sunday in the United States is celebrated in other ways as well. Whether or not they happen to be followers of any church, people in the United States are inclined to have family gatherings on this day, and large feasts are usually served. For some people, Easter Sunday is merely a celebration of spring while for others it has tremendous religious significance. The most prevalent Easter Sunday tradition involves church services. Some churches hold elaborate parades to celebrate the day, and others have less noticeable celebrations. Most churches at least have social events over the Easter holiday allowing them to spend time with their fellow churchgoers and to socialize. Picnics and other events are also commonly held during this particular holiday. Secular events held during Easter Sunday include Easter egg hunts and other activities for children. These events are open to everyone and don't have any particular religious overtones to them. Community events are often held as well simply because the holiday is notable and people tend to want to get together. The Easter Bunny, eggs, flowers, and other symbols, are very much associated with spring and are still important traditions for this particular holiday. Because denominations in the United States are so diverse, you'll find many different traditions being celebrated on Easter Sunday. Some traditions involve all-night vigils before the holiday itself. And now, here's the answer to the quiz. Do you know when many churches hold Easter services? Ans: Services at the break of day, are among the most popular church events on Easter Sunday. During these services, Christians come to church in the pre-dawn hours and have their service as the Sun rises. For many, these services have a powerful symbolic significance.
How is this lesson? Did you learn something interesting? What kind of Easter traditions exist in your country? Reference (optional) History of Easter The History of Easter & Origin of the Easter Bunny and Easter Eggs? " What is the origin of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs? " In this video, I'll answer that question from a historical and biblical perspective.
It is commonly thought that the word ' Easter ' comes from a pagan figure called ' Eostre ' who was celebrated as the ' Goddess of Spring ' by the Saxons of Northern Europe. The only problem with this theory is that it has no basis in history. The existence of a goddess named 'Eostre' or a spring festival in her honor, is based on pure conjecture .
The same is true of the origin of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs —no one knows for sure how these things became a part of Easter observances . The most we can say is that the word Easter is probably related to the word East (ost in German ) and that the Saxons had a month they called ' Eosturmononath'. The legend of the Easter bunny bringing eggs appears to have been brought to the United States by settlers from Germany. The German tradition of the Easter bunny (or Oschter Haws ) migrated to America in the 1700s, accompanying German immigrants, many of whom settled in Pennsylvania. Over the past 200 years, the Easter bunny has become the most commercially recognized symbol of Easter in the United States . Other countries use other animals as the symbol of Easter, such as the Cuckoo in Switzerland .
In legend, the Easter bunny, also called the Easter hare , and the spring bunny, brings baskets filled with colored eggs, candy, and sometimes toys to the homes of children on the night before Easter, in much the same way as Santa Claus is said to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. The Easter Bunny will either put the baskets in a designated place or hide them somewhere in the house or garden for the children to find when they wake up in the morning, giving rise to the tradition of the Easter egg hunt . Obviously, none of this comes from the Bible.
Should Christian parents allow their children to participate in traditional activities that refer to the Easter bunny? This is a question both parents and church leaders struggle with. There is nothing essentially evil about the Easter bunny. What is important is our focus. If our focus is on Christ and not the Easter bunny, our children will understand that, like Santa Claus, the Easter bunny is merely a symbol . Easter should be a time to reflect upon and celebrate the resurrection of Christ . History of Easter Eggs Faberge Eggs 12 Fabulous Fabergé Eggs — choose your favorite The History of the White House Easter Egg Roll The International Easter Traditions Quiz Belgian Easter Celebration The Holy Week Processions in Sevilla, Spain (Procesion de los Pasos) What do they wear in Semana Santa? Celebrated by Catholic religious brotherhoods, Semana Santa is traditionally observed with penitent processions and passion plays all over Spain. Worn under the mantilla is a peineta, or a large decorative comb fixed to the hair, which is traditionally worn in a low bun . Why do penitents in Spain wear hoods?
The penitent hoods date back to the Spanish Inquisition. In the 15th century, it was decreed that those convicted of religious crimes had to wear conical hoods so that everyone knew they had sinned . This symbol of imposed penitence from the Inquisition was later translated into processions. Why does Costaleros wear a cloth over their head and neck?
To this day, each costalero wears a coffee bag over his head, as a kind of protective headgear , like that which dockworkers once used (even if many are now replicas, rather than the actual thing). Reference Links (optional) What are the origins of Easter?
Origins of Easter 5 Facts about Semana Santa: Holy Week in Spain Seville's streets flooded with 60 processions throughout Holy Week
All You Need To Know About Semana Santa in Seville Easter Around the World
29 Traditional Easter Foods From Around the World Classic Easter dishes around the world

Related:
Celebrating Mardi Gras in New Orleans Discussion Questions (optional) (1) What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘Easter?
(2) What is Easter?
(3) According to the Christian religion, Easter is a more important holiday than Christmas. Why to you think this is so?
(4) How do people spend Easter in your country?
(5) What are the traditional Easter dishes in your country?
(6) How do people prepare for Easter?
(7) What more would you like to know about Easter?
(8) Are there any special rituals performed right before or after Easter?
(9) Have you ever spent Easter in another country? Would you like to?
(10) "Easter tells us that life is to be interpreted not simply in terms of things but in terms of ideals." What do you think this quote means? (11) Should Easter be at the same time / on the same date every year?
(12) What do you like and dislike about Easter?
(13) What's the symbolism of the Easter bunny and Easter eggs?
(14) What is the meaning of Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday?
(15) What do people in your country do on Easter Monday?
(16) Do you prefer Easter or Christmas?
(17) There would be no Christmas if there was no Easter. Do you agree?
(18) Is Easter less commercial than Christmas? Why (not)?
(19) Someone once said: "The resurrection gives my life meaning and direction and the opportunity to start over no matter what my circumstances." What do you think this means?
(20) Do you think that people will stop celebrating Easter one day?

【culture-english-38】what-wedding-traditions-look-like-around-the-world-世界各地的婚禮傳統

【Culture English -38】What Wedding Traditions Look Like Around The World ( 世界各地的婚禮傳統 )

What Wedding Traditions Look Like Around The World Cultures throughout the world have their own unique ideas on how to say, "I do." We're taking you around the globe to show you how people celebrate their big day. The dollar dance, also known as the money or apron dance, is a tradition associated with countries all over, including Poland, Hungary, Nigeria, the Philippines, and Mexico. These videos feature a Mexican-American wedding and a Mexican-Filipino wedding. Money is tossed, handed, or pinned onto the couple while different guests take turns dancing with the newlyweds. The money is a great way to help with a little extra financial support and to let them know you wish them a life of prosperity. Jumping the broom refers to a wedding tradition in which a couple literally jumps over a broom. There's a misconception that it began during slavery in the United States, but it originated in Ghana and is still practiced there. The broom holds spiritual value and symbolizes the sweeping away of evils and past wrongs. Today, some African American couples include it in their ceremony as a tribute to tradition. In Greece, the koumbaro is similar to the best man. On the morning of the wedding, they help the groom prepare for the ceremony by helping them shave and get ready. It's a practice that signifies trust between close friends. In the days before the wedding, one or both of the fiancés are taken by their friends and family and covered in various substances like soot, feathers, food, and more. The tradition started as a way to ward off danger from supernatural forces. After being covered up, they're paraded around town while their friends make plenty of noise and make a scene for all to see. The Chinese tea ceremony is a wedding tradition that bonds two families together. While kneeling, the couple serves tea to their parents. Traditionally, the couple serves the groom's parents and elders in order of seniority, followed by the bride's family. This serves as a formal introduction, to show respect, and to express gratitude. In return, the couple usually receives lucky red envelopes with money or jewelry. In this pre-wedding ritual, turmeric paste is rubbed onto the couple's skin by friends and family. In India, turmeric can signify a lot of things, including purity, fertility, and good health. The paste also gives the couple a nice glow for their big day. The ceremony is usually accompanied by traditional songs and dances and is supposed to ease nerves. This German tradition has guests smashing porcelain before the wedding to wish the couple luck in their married life. The couple is responsible for cleaning up the shards to symbolize teamwork. The more shards of broken dishes, the better the luck the couple will have. Discussion Questions (optional) (1) What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘weddings’?
(2) Are weddings important?
(3) What kind of weddings do you think are best?
(4) Do you wish you could go to more weddings?
(5) Why do many people, not like weddings?
(6) Do you think it’s easy or difficult to plan your own wedding?
(7) What’s the best and worst wedding you’ve ever been to?
(8) What are the best and worst things about weddings?
(9) Do you think weddings in other countries are better than those in your country?
(10) Do you think your wedding is the happiest day of your life? (11) Do you like weddings?
(12) What kind of wedding would you like (have liked)?
(13) Which celebrity wedding would you really like to go to?
(14) What do you think of royal weddings?
(15) What do people get married in your culture promise each other at a wedding?
(16) In your country, do people have to invite people they don’t like to their wedding?
(17) What is the best part of a wedding: the ceremony, the vows, or the reception?
(18) Do you think that one day, weddings will become a thing of the past?
(19) What do you think of alternative weddings such as underwater weddings or weddings on the wing of a flying airplane?
(20) What three adjectives would you use to describe weddings?

【cultureenglish-38】what-wedding-traditions-look-like-around-the-world

【Culture English -38】What Wedding Traditions Look Like Around The World ( 世界各地的婚禮傳統 )

What Wedding Traditions Look Like Around The World Cultures throughout the world have their own unique ideas on how to say, "I do." We're taking you around the globe to show you how people celebrate their big day. The dollar dance, also known as the money or apron dance, is a tradition associated with countries all over, including Poland, Hungary, Nigeria, the Philippines, and Mexico. These videos feature a Mexican-American wedding and a Mexican-Filipino wedding. Money is tossed, handed, or pinned onto the couple while different guests take turns dancing with the newlyweds. The money is a great way to help with a little extra financial support and to let them know you wish them a life of prosperity. Jumping the broom refers to a wedding tradition in which a couple literally jumps over a broom. There's a misconception that it began during slavery in the United States, but it originated in Ghana and is still practiced there. The broom holds spiritual value and symbolizes the sweeping away of evils and past wrongs. Today, some African American couples include it in their ceremony as a tribute to tradition. In Greece, the koumbaro is similar to the best man. On the morning of the wedding, they help the groom prepare for the ceremony by helping them shave and get ready. It's a practice that signifies trust between close friends. In the days before the wedding, one or both of the fiancés are taken by their friends and family and covered in various substances like soot, feathers, food, and more. The tradition started as a way to ward off danger from supernatural forces. After being covered up, they're paraded around town while their friends make plenty of noise and make a scene for all to see. The Chinese tea ceremony is a wedding tradition that bonds two families together. While kneeling, the couple serves tea to their parents. Traditionally, the couple serves the groom's parents and elders in order of seniority, followed by the bride's family. This serves as a formal introduction, to show respect, and to express gratitude. In return, the couple usually receives lucky red envelopes with money or jewelry. In this pre-wedding ritual, turmeric paste is rubbed onto the couple's skin by friends and family. In India, turmeric can signify a lot of things, including purity, fertility, and good health. The paste also gives the couple a nice glow for their big day. The ceremony is usually accompanied by traditional songs and dances and is supposed to ease nerves. This German tradition has guests smashing porcelain before the wedding to wish the couple luck in their married life. The couple is responsible for cleaning up the shards to symbolize teamwork. The more shards of broken dishes, the better the luck the couple will have. References (optional) 42 Fascinating Wedding Traditions From Around the World 15 Unusual Wedding Traditions From Across The World Discussion Questions (optional) (1) What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘weddings’?
(2) Are weddings important?
(3) What kind of weddings do you think are best?
(4) Do you wish you could go to more weddings?
(5) Why do many people, not like weddings?
(6) Do you think it’s easy or difficult to plan your own wedding?
(7) What’s the best and worst wedding you’ve ever been to?
(8) What are the best and worst things about weddings?
(9) Do you think weddings in other countries are better than those in your country?
(10) Do you think your wedding is the happiest day of your life? (11) Do you like weddings?
(12) What kind of wedding would you like (have liked)?
(13) Which celebrity wedding would you really like to go to?
(14) What do you think of royal weddings?
(15) What do people get married in your culture promise each other at a wedding?
(16) In your country, do people have to invite people they don’t like to their wedding?
(17) What is the best part of a wedding: the ceremony, the vows, or the reception?
(18) Do you think that one day, weddings will become a thing of the past?
(19) What do you think of alternative weddings such as underwater weddings or weddings on the wing of a flying airplane?
(20) What three adjectives would you use to describe weddings?

【cultureenglish-46】autumn-leaf-viewing-in-japan

【Culture English -46】Autumn Leaf Viewing In Japan ( 日本秋葉觀賞 )

Autumn Leaf Viewing In Japan Just as how the Japanese enjoy viewing cherry blossoms in the spring, the changing color of the Autumn leaves, known as Koyo, is an event that draws crowds all across Japan. Today we’re in Kyushu’s least touristy prefecture, Saga, at Kunenan, a historical Japanese residence that only opens its doors to the public for 9 days in November, to allow visitors to enjoy the autumn foliage. The Kunen-an residence was originally owned by a wealthy businessman in the early 1900s and gets its name from the fact that it took 9 years to build the majestic garden that draws visitors, even to this day. Now, Saga Prefecture owns and preserves the land, citing it as an important cultural asset to Saga Prefecture. Visitors are welcome to roam the garden of the residence and take a look inside the traditional structure, admiring the sturdy construction of the straw-thatched roof, the mud walls, and the bamboo lattices. All while enjoying the rich natural colors of the autumn garden. The site is so well preserved that walking through it, you almost feel as if you’ve been transported back in time, or you’re on a movie set of some kind. Either way, it feels absolutely surreal to be there in person. The tradition of autumn leaf viewing dates back to the Heian period, over 1000 years ago, when the nobles would go on excursions to the mountains, and gather colored leaves. Now, autumn leaf viewing is an event enjoyed by families, friends, and couples, with popular sites often holding fall festivals to coincide with the changing colors. Shrines and temples are often popular places to visit as well, the beautiful nature is often interpreted as a sign that the gods at the shrine are showing their presence. I always took the autumn leaves for granted when I lived in Canada, funny considering our flag is the red maple leaf. One of the things I love about Japan is its sensitivity to the changing seasons and its appreciation for nature. Learning to appreciate nature’s beauty helped me recognize the natural beauty in my home country as well. Another popular way to enjoy the changing autumn leaves in Japan is by illumination after dark. During the peak color-changing season, some shrines and temples will light up the autumn leaves, creating allowing them to glow vividly against the night sky. We decided to visit Daikouzenji, in Saga Prefecture, a shrine where visitors can light spiritual candles and pray for the safety of their home and loved ones. Daikouzenji is built on a hill, making it a prime spot for autumn leaf viewing. It’s also home to a luscious botanical garden, all of which is illuminated by bright lights after sundown, creating a romantic and whimsical atmosphere that’s very popular with couples. A popular fall festival dish, and one I wholeheartedly recommend, is zenzai. A sweet red bean soup, with chewy balls of mochi rice cake in it. Fall is not a busy season for tourism in Japan, so flights are usually much cheaper during this time of year, but if you time your trip right, you will be rewarded with some of the most gorgeous scenery Japan has to offer. Top 10 Autumn Color Spots in Japan

【culture-english-46】autumn-leaf-viewing-in-japan-日本秋葉觀賞

【Culture English -46】Autumn Leaf Viewing In Japan ( 日本秋葉觀賞 )

Autumn Leaf Viewing In Japan Just as how the Japanese enjoy viewing cherry blossoms in the spring, the changing color of the Autumn leaves, known as Koyo, is an event that draws crowds all across Japan. Today we’re in Kyushu’s least touristy prefecture, Saga, at Kunenan, a historical Japanese residence that only opens its doors to the public for 9 days in November, to allow visitors to enjoy the autumn foliage. The Kunen-an residence was originally owned by a wealthy businessman in the early 1900s and gets its name from the fact that it took 9 years to build the majestic garden that draws visitors, even to this day. Now, Saga Prefecture owns and preserves the land, citing it as an important cultural asset to Saga Prefecture. Visitors are welcome to roam the garden of the residence and take a look inside the traditional structure, admiring the sturdy construction of the straw-thatched roof, the mud walls, and the bamboo lattices. All while enjoying the rich natural colors of the autumn garden. The site is so well preserved that walking through it, you almost feel as if you’ve been transported back in time, or you’re on a movie set of some kind. Either way, it feels absolutely surreal to be there in person. The tradition of autumn leaf viewing dates back to the Heian period, over 1000 years ago, when the nobles would go on excursions to the mountains, and gather colored leaves. Now, autumn leaf viewing is an event enjoyed by families, friends, and couples, with popular sites often holding fall festivals to coincide with the changing colors. Shrines and temples are often popular places to visit as well, the beautiful nature is often interpreted as a sign that the gods at the shrine are showing their presence. I always took the autumn leaves for granted when I lived in Canada, funny considering our flag is the red maple leaf. One of the things I love about Japan is its sensitivity to the changing seasons and its appreciation for nature. Learning to appreciate nature’s beauty helped me recognize the natural beauty in my home country as well. Another popular way to enjoy the changing autumn leaves in Japan is by illumination after dark. During the peak color-changing season, some shrines and temples will light up the autumn leaves, creating allowing them to glow vividly against the night sky. We decided to visit Daikouzenji, in Saga Prefecture, a shrine where visitors can light spiritual candles and pray for the safety of their home and loved ones. Daikouzenji is built on a hill, making it a prime spot for autumn leaf viewing. It’s also home to a luscious botanical garden, all of which is illuminated by bright lights after sundown, creating a romantic and whimsical atmosphere that’s very popular with couples. A popular fall festival dish, and one I wholeheartedly recommend, is zenzai. A sweet red bean soup, with chewy balls of mochi rice cake in it. Fall is not a busy season for tourism in Japan, so flights are usually much cheaper during this time of year, but if you time your trip right, you will be rewarded with some of the most gorgeous scenery Japan has to offer. Top 10 Autumn Color Spots in Japan

【pronunciation-07】-ə-a-bout

【Pronunciation - 07】/ə/ (a)bout /ə/ /b/ /o/ /t/ ( 關於 )

【pronunciation-09】-u-b-oo-t

【Pronunciation - 09】/u/ b(oo)t /b/ /u/ /t/ ( 開機 )

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